Discover more than 5000 plants that are found across Canada. MY ACCOUNT
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Written by: Summer Graham

 

Spring has sprung, and it is once again time to turn our thoughts to flowers, gardens, and warmer days. Spring may not arrive locally just yet depending on where you are in Canada, but it is likely a highly anticipated event for most “plant people”, with keen eyes watching for the first flowers to bloom.

 

These early-blooming species are often called “heralds of spring”, with their appearance on the landscape often accepted as a sure sign that warmer temperatures are just around the corner. In Nunavut, it is the territorial flower of Purple Mountain Saxifrage (Saxifraga oppositifolia; Inuit name: 'aupaluktunnguat.’) that often blooms first.

 

Some species bloom early to take advantage of the higher levels of sunlight available while trees are still budding and have not formed full canopies yet. These species are often quick to fade after blooming. Others coordinate their flowers to match up with the activity of key pollinators and play an important role in supporting these wildlife species as they become active after the long winter.

 

Here are 10 native plants from across Canada that bloom early in the season:

 

1. Bloodroot

(Sanguinaria canadensis)

Distribution in Canada:
MB, ON, QC, NB, NS
Bloom-time: March–May

 

View Plant
 

Bloodroot

2. Western Skunk Cabbage

(Lysichiton americanus)

Distribution in Canada:
BC
Bloom-time: March–June

 

Photo by Scott Darbey (used with modification, CC BY 2.0)

 

View Plant

 

Western Skunk Cabbage

3. Flowering Currant

(Ribes sanguineum var. sanguineum)

Distribution in Canada:
BC
Bloom-time: April–May

 

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Flowering Currant

4. Yellow Trout Lily

(Erythronium americanum var. americanum)

Distribution in Canada:
ON, QC, NB, NS
Bloom-time: April–May

 

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Yellow Trout Lily

5. Blue Cohosh

(Caulophyllum thalictoides)

Distribution in Canada:
MB, ON, QC, NB, NS
Bloom-time: April–June

 

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Blue Cohosh

6. Jack-in-the-Pulpit

(Arisaema triphyllum)

Distribution in Canada:
MB, ON, QC, NB, NS, PE
Bloom-time: April–June

 

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Jack-in-the-Pulpit

7. Round-lobed Hepatica

(Anemone americana)

Distribution in Canada:
MB, ON, QC, NB, NS, PE
Bloom-time: May–June

 

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Round-lobed Hepatica

8. Blue-eyed Grass

(Sisyrinchium montanum)

Distribution in Canada:
BC, AB, SK, M, ON, QC, NB, NS, PE, NF, YT, NT
Bloom-time: May–July

 

View Plant

 

Marsh Marigold

9. Bearberry or Kinnikinick

(Arctostaphylos uva-ursi)

Distribution in Canada:
BC, AB, SK, MB, ON, QC, NB, NS, PE, NF, YT, NT, NU
Bloom-time: May–July

 

View Plant

 

Bearberry or Kinnikinick

10. Purple Mountain Saxifrage

(Saxifraga oppositifolia)

Distribution in Canada:
BC, AB, MB, ON, QC, NS, NF, YT, NT, NU
Bloom-time: May–August

 

View Plant

 

Purple Mountain Saxifrage

 

If you're able to get outside, see if you can spot any of these early bloomers appearing in natural areas near you! Or if quarantine is keeping you indoors, use the CanPlant Database or check out the links below to virtually explore spring plants.

 

Additional Resources:

 

• Ontario Wildflowers – Species Blooming in Spring

 

• Owlcation – Spring Wildflowers in Southwestern British Columbia

 

• Destination Nunavut – Flora

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Written by: Nicole White

 

The COVID-19 outbreak is an exponential crisis, where each of us can literally save lives in our communities by heeding the precautions recommended by the WHO and Health Canada to reduce its spread.

 

We hope you're all doing your best to stay safe and healthy. A connection to nature can help reduce stress and enhance mental health, so we've prepared a list of resources and recommendations to help us all get through this time.

 

Books

Any book you can dream of can be ordered online in hard copy or ebook form. Also, while your local library may be closed, you may still be able to check out ebooks or digital audiobooks on their website. Here are a couple of our reading recommendations:

 

An Orchard Invisible: A Natural History of Seeds by Johnathan Silvertown
Seeds piqued my interest while I was working as a lab technician to help develop seed bank technology in Nova Scotia. This book about the evolution, genetic beauty, and surprising diversity of seeds will be compelling to home gardeners and scientists alike.

 

 

Gardening Your Front Yard: Projects and Ideas for Big and Small Spaces by Tara Nolan

Janel says, 'Mari-Ann is currently using her extra time to read our friend Tara Nolan’s newly released book and is loving it.'

 

Seed to Seed: The Secret Life of Plants by Nichlas Harberd
The author uses a diary format to follow a single Arabidopsis thaliana (a common weed often used in scientific studies) specimen throughout its entire lifecycle. Sketches and storytelling are used to illuminate plant biology and meditate on the beauty of natural processes.

 

Bringing Nature Home by D. W. Tallamy

Summer says: 'Once you have read “Bringing Nature Home” and start making changes in your own back-yard, you will soon want to buy a copy for every friend and family member to help your efforts multiply. The review on the front of the book says it all, If you have a backyard, this book is for you.'

 

 

Online Resources

While museums and botanical gardens may be closed, you can still delve into natural history for free online:

 

Emily Dickenson's Herbarium
The reclusive poet was also a skilled gardener who independently studied plants at a time when women were excluded from the scientific community. Harvard has made a high-quality digital version of the herbarium she created in her youth here.

 

Emily Dickenson's Herbarium


The Cotton MS Vitellius C III

CanPlant cannot help you find which plants grow best in dragon's blood, but this Old English manuscript, made available by the British Library, can do that and then some. An interesting view for those interested in botany and medieval history.

 

The Cotton MS Vitellius C III

 

Create a Plant List with CanPlant
Create a free account on the CanPlant website, filter and search to find the right plants for where you are, and develop your own custom plant lists. Lists can be saved, downloaded, and printed!

 

Videos

The National Film Board of Canada
The NFB has many high-quality plant films and documentaries going back over five decades! All of these are available to stream for free in your browser.

 

Kingdom of Plants 3D
This David Attenborough documentary features as much diversity as an episode of Planet Earth, but it's all shot in a single location -- the world-class Kew Gardens in London.

 

Activities

Get Outside

Note: Please check the recommendations of your public health professionals for this one! In some cases, it may be advisable to stay indoors.

 

Christina says, 'Nature is one of the few things is still open for enjoyment. Go for a solo hike or jog in your favourite natural space. Studies have shown that immersing yourself in nature helps to reduce stress and improve mental health (something we all could use right now!)

 

Not only that, but maintaining physical activity and getting some good ol’ Vitamin D is important while we are all cooped up inside for the near future. Make it a time to reflect and be calm, or exert pent up energy or anxiety that many of us are feeling these days.

 

Hiking in Western Canada

 

AllTrails is a great (and free!) app that shows you trails in your area, and allows you to filter for less popular spots as we all try and maintain social distancing. As a safety precaution, be sure to carry your cell phone and have a friend or family member aware of your whereabouts if you do endeavour out alone.'

 

Forest (App)

Summer says, 'I personally find it very hard to “unplug” especially at a time like this when you want to constantly check the news for updates, not healthy! I use this app to temporarily lock my phone to stop me looking at it, it grows a virtual tree that will die if you stop before your time is up. Bonus, you get points that can be redeemed to purchase a real tree the company will plant through a tree planting initiative! '

 

Submit Photos to CanPlant

Do you have any photos in your collection of plant species you've identified? If you want to help CanPlant's mission, now would be a great time to see if you can help us fill in the gaps in our database. Use the Submit a Photo form, or Contact Us directly if you have a larger collection you'd like to share.

 

Join the Conversation

Connect with us on Facebook and Instagram, leave a comment, and let us know how you're connecting with plants and nature during this time.

 

Take care of yourself and your loved ones. And if you can, let a connection to nature help you be resilient.

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Written by Carl-Adam Wegenschimmel

 

The theme of this year’s World Wildlife Day celebration is “Sustaining All Life on Earth,” which recognizes biodiversity as a key component in protecting natural life.

 

To this end, it is important to acknowledge all species, including those that are often ignored or seen as not having any economic value to humans. We need to take a holistic perspective and recognize the interconnectedness of all living things. Although many plants are valued by people, many other species remain ignored but nonetheless have intrinsic worth and act as key components of ecosystems.

 

Here in Canada, we are still discovering and learning about our own plant communities. During Ontario Botanists' Big Year 2019 on iNaturalist, Kevin Gevaert discovered a plant that is new to Canada: Slender Three-seeded Mercury (Acalypha gracilens) -- surprisingly within the urban boundary of Caththam-Kent.

 

This past fall, while I was out exploring a section of the Niagara Escarpment with fellow ecologists Tristan Knight and Jose Maloles, Tristan discovered a moss growing on the cliff face which he identified as Fan Moss (Forsstroemia trichomitria). This species was rediscovered in Quebec in 2011 after not being seen in North America since the late 1800s. Since then, it has only been observed once in Ontario and once in Quebec.

 

Fan Moss: Photo by Carl-Adam Wegenschimmel

Photo by Carl-Adam Wegenschimmel

 

Tristan’s discovery marked the second modern record for Ontario and fourth extant record in North America.

 

Jennifer Doubt, a botanist at the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa, is currently documenting Fan Moss distribution and abundance in Canada, to help understand its conservation status.

 

Another recent discovery in northeastern North America is the Tall Beech Fern (Phegopteris excelsior), seen for the first time in 2019. Although it hasn’t been documented in Ontario yet, I believe it is only a matter of time before some keen observer is able to separate it from the closely-related and better-known Broad Beech Fern (Phegopteris hexagonoptera).

 

 I am often amazed in the ability of healthy, mature forests and plant communities to support substantial fungi and lichen communities, with many species still completely under the radar. Here too, there are likely many discoveries yet to be made.

 

For example, while recently exploring a swamp in Hamilton, I found a species of Chaenothecopsis fungi growing on Paper Birch (Betula papyrifera) which appears to be new to science based on previous collections in Ohio. Another new species of lichen was recently discovered in swamps near Toronto, a stubble lichen (Chaenotheca selvae), which seems to have an affinity for stumps of mature Maple trees.

 

Photo by Carl-Adam Wegenschimmel

 

I think that these discoveries underscore how much we have yet to learn, even in places that are generally well-surveyed and emphasize the need to continue to study our ecosystems.

 

Discoveries like these also highlight the need to protect natural areas, which maintain biodiversity at both the local and global level.

 

Many wildlife observations today come from citizen science initiatives, which gather the unique experience and knowledge of individuals into centralized databases. These include eBird, created by Cornell University and the Audobon Society, and iNaturalist, offered by the California Academy of Sciences and the National Geographic Society.

 

These apps make it easy for anyone to contribute to our understanding of biodiversity. This can create newfound appreciation and positive momentum towards sustaining our natural world. One of our big dreams for CanPlant is to use this kind of technology and public participation to enhance our understanding of Canadian plants and landscapes.

 

Are you an intrepid botanizer who would like to participate in CanPlant's work? You can use our Submit a Photo form to contribute your plant photos, or Contact Us directly if you have a larger collection you'd like to share.

 

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Written by: Summer Graham

 

Monarch caterpillar on Swamp Milkweed

 

Every time you decide to plant something in your garden or yard, you have the opportunity to make an important choice.

 

You can either choose a native species, one that can support a greater abundance of native wildlife (particularly insect herbivores) (Burghardt et al. 2010), or you can plant a non-native species that is less likely to have this benefit, and can even potentially become invasive.

 

This choice can have huge, bottom-up impacts on wildlife populations, especially now that Canadian landscapes are increasingly becoming more urbanized. Native nesting bird species often rely on insect populations to feed their young, so the amount of native or non-native vegetation on a landscape can directly impact the diversity and abundance of bird species in the area (Burghardt et al. 2009; Narango et al. 2010).

 

This is quantified by Douglas W. Tallamy, wildlife ecology professor at the University of Delaware:

Black-capped Chickadee

"...But there are serious ecological consequences to such choices, and another exercise you can do at home makes them clear. This spring, if you live in North America, put up a chickadee nest box in your yard. If you are lucky, a pair of chickadees will move in and raise a family. While they are feeding their young, watch what the chickadees bring to the nest: mostly caterpillars. Both parents take turns feeding the chicks, enabling them to bring a caterpillar to the nest once every three minutes. And they do this from 6 a.m. until 8 p.m. for each of the 16 to 18 days it takes the chicks to fledge. That’s a total of 350 to 570 caterpillars every day, depending on how many chicks they have. So, an incredible 6,000 to 9,000 caterpillars are required to make one clutch of chickadees."

 

In addition to not supporting native wildlife, some non-native plants can actually seriously threaten certain species. For example, consider the relationship between the Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) and native Milkweed species.

 

The Monarch has evolved so closely with native Milkweed species that it now feeds exclusively on them, and so relies on Milkweed as a host plant to lay its eggs on. European Swallow-wort (Vincetoxicum rossicum, a.k.a. Dog-strangling Vine) is a non-native member of the milkweed family that is considered invasive due to its rapid spread and highly prolific nature.

 

Monarchs can mistakenly lay their eggs on Swallow-wort plants, believing them to be native milkweeds. The caterpillars that hatch on these plants will die, as they are unable to feed on the non-native species (NCC, 2019).

 

So, what can you do? First, choose native! Use available resources like the CanPlant Species Database to choose species listed as native to your region that will help to support local wildlife and contribute to the ecosystem.

 

Learn more about milkweeds and where they fit in your garden by checking out these recommended species:

 

Purple Milkweed

(Asclepias purpurascens)

 

View Plant

 

Purple Milkweed

 

Swamp Milkweed

(Asclepias incarnata)

 

View Plant

 

Swamp Milkweed

 

Butterflyweed

(Asclepias tuberosa)

 

View Plant

 

Butterflyweed

 

Common Milkweed

(Asclepias syriaca)

 

View Plant

 

Common Milkweed

 

Showy Milkweed

(Asclepias speciosa)

 

View Plant

 

Showy Milkweed

 

 

Second, control and manage invasive, non-native species on your property that pose a threat to native biodiversity. Visit the Ontario Invasive Plant Council website to learn more about managing invasive plant species.

 

Additional Resources & Further Reading

• Ontario Invasive Plant Council “Grow Me Instead” Guide

• Opinion: In Your Garden, Choose Plants That Help the Environment

Douglas W. Tallamy, The New York Times

 

References:

Burghardt, K. T., Tallamy, D. W. and W.G. Shriver. 2009. Impact of Native Plants on Bird and Butterfly Biodiversity in Suburban Landscapes. Conservation Biology, 23: 219-224. doi:10.1111/j.1523-1739.2008.01076.x

 

Burghardt, K. T., D. W. Tallamy, C. Philips, and K. J. Shropshire. 2010. Non-native plants reduce abundance, richness, and host specialization in lepidopteran communities. Ecosphere 1(5):art11. doi:10.1890/ES10-00032.1

 

Narango, D.L., Tallamy, D.W.  and P.P. Marra. 2010. Native plants improve breeding and foraging habitat for an insectivorous bird. Biological Conservation: 213, Part A, ISSN 0006-3207. doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2017.06.029.

Nature Conservancy Canada (NCC). 2019. “Dog-strangling Vine”. Available online at: http://www.natureconservancy.ca/en/what-we-do/resource-centre/invasive-species/dog-strangling_vine.html

 

Photo: Black-capped Chickadee. Photo by Mark Daly, courtesy of the Canadian Wildlife Federation.

 

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Written by: Nicole White

 

People used to view wetlands as a waste of space: they can't be built, they can't be easily traversed by boat, and they aren't profitable for most types of agriculture. So why are wetlands so important?

 

Now we're learning that wetlands are some of the most biologically productive sites on our planet. They hold water in times of flood or drought, purify the environment, and sequester carbon from the atmosphere. I've heard them called 'Nature's Kidneys'. They sustain life by providing essential year-round or seasonal habitat for many species of fish, birds, and other animals. They are also home to plant communities found nowhere else, and have a breathtaking beauty all their own.

 

Events like World Wetlands Day (Sunday, February 2) work to shift these attitudes, and effect change.

 

As a small celebration of World Wetlands Day, I conducted an informal poll of my ecologist colleagues to find out what everyone's favourite wetland plant was. The results were fun and I hope our appreciation of these plants inspires you to learn more about them:

 

Marsh Marigold

(Caltha palustris)

'I love Marsh Marigold because the flowers are like little bursts of sunlight when walking through a wetland or swampy woods.'

 

View Plant

Marsh Marigold

Turtlehead

(Chelone glabra)

'Mostly because it looks like a turtle!'

 

View Plant

Turtlehead

Bog Buckbean

(Menyanthes trifoliata)

'Bog Buckbean looks like a giant clover, and I've found it in Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia.'

 

View Plant

Bog Buckbean

 

Buttonbush

(Cephalanthus occidentalis)

'The flowers are just so striking... and look like pom-poms or fireworks. They're such a lovely surprise to find.'

 

View Plant

Buttonbush

Skunk Cabbage

(Symplocarpus foetidus)

'Foul-smelling but a very reliable groundwater seepage indicator; quite unusual in that its flowers can actually melt the snow so that it can get a head start on flowering and pollination by flies and beetles in the early spring.'

 

View Plant

Skunk Cabbage

Any Type of Bladderwort

(Utricularia cornuta shown here)

'They have beautiful flowers, they float on the water surface and they eat bugs. I think that's pretty neat.'

 

View Plant

Horned Bladderwort

 

Cranberry

(Vaccinium macrocarpon)

'It reminds me of Thanksgiving at my family cottage.'

 

View Plant

Cranberry

Common Pipewort

(Eriocaulon aquaticum)

'Stands of common pipewort look like drifts of delicate white pompoms hovering over shallow water. The flower is intricate and the plant is unassuming. Quite lovely.'

 

View Plant

Cranberry

Pitcher Plant

(Sarracenia purpurea)

'Carnivorous -- the story last year that a population in Algonquin consumes salamanders was a bit disconcerting but cool!'

 

View Plant

Pitcher Plant

 

We hope you're inspired to learn more about the strange and wonderful plant life growing in our country's wetlands. Check out the links below, or visit the CanPlant Search Page to discover more species.

 


Recommended Further Reading:

 

• World Wetland Day 2020: Official Page
Find a World Wetlands Day event near you, learn more about wetlands, get free educational materials and infographic cards to share on your social media accounts.

 

• The Secret World of Bog
This photojournalist's foray into West Coast coastal temperate rainforest bogs was published in 2016 and won a gold award in the Canadian Online Publishing Awards. The photos in this beautiful piece show the area's flora on all scales, from peat moss fasicles to forests of stunted pines and cedars.

 

• Pitcher plants discovered snacking on baby salamanders in Ontario park
A recent CBC stories shows that our native carnivorous plants are more voracious than we might think.


• Treasured Wetlands of Nova Scotia 2019 Story Map

An interactive look at wetland habitats in Nova Scotia. If you're not on the East Coast right now, here's a way to visit these sites virtually!
 

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Written by: Mary Anne Young

 

CanPlant is an evolution of the Native Plant Database, a searchable database of Canadian native plants that was online from 2003 – 2017.

 

The Native Plant Database was an initiative of Evergreen, which launched originally to support the organization’s cross-Canada work in urban stewardship and greenspace restoration. Evergreen is a Canadian national charity with a vision to enable flourishing cities; since 1991, Evergreen has worked to “convene, collaborate and catalyze ideas into action”, with projects including school ground greening, promoting urban agriculture, investing in public art, promoting youth innovation in city building, and more. For more information see www.evergreen.ca.

 

The Native Plant Database was taken offline as Evergreen did not have the resources needed to maintain and manage the database. In 2018, a Request for Proposal process was initiated to select another organization to re-launch the database and expand on its original vision. Dougan & Associates, an ecological consulting and design firm based in Southern Ontario, was selected to be the new stewards of the database. The Dougan & Associates team is very excited for this opportunity to dig into over 5000 plant records and to brainstorm new and exciting directions for the future of the site.

 

CanPlant was chosen as the new name for the Native Plant Database; this name was chosen to both explain the breadth of the website’s scope (Canadian Plants) as well as to be encouraging and uplifting (yes you CAN plant!)

 

The newly launched CanPlant website contains all of the data and functionality as the original Native Plant Database, and D&A are brainstorming what the future of this resource may be – information for plant growers and gardeners, climate change mitigation resources, academic partnerships, etc. If you are interested in participating please contact us.

 

For what Canplant has to offer right now, click here to start browsing 5000+ native Canadian plants.

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Written by: Nicole White

 

Dougan & Associates staff meet to develop the new CanPlant website

 

CanPlant has made a commitment to use blogging as a tool for open, independent sharing of plant knowledge. Our vision is to regularly provide insightful articles useful to both general audiences and professional plant people, connecting Canadians in ways that promote curiosity, respect, and understanding of our complex relationships with plants.

 

Blogging and other new media represent the potential for a radical departure from traditional media and access of information. Ideally, a message's reach can be broadened and more voices to be heard. As an alternative to scholarly articles, blogging can serve as an intermediary, allowing information related to cross-disciplinary fields such as botany, biology, ecological restoration, landscape architecture, and conservation to be engaged with by all readers.

 

We intend to use these tools to draw on and complement the structured information living in the CanPlant database, to carry forward the principles developed by our predecessor, Evergreen, and to tap into the collective knowledge within our communities.

 

 

Our team at Dougan & Associates possess ecological and design knowledge that we're excited to set free beyond the walls of the office. We also want to use the blog as a platform to give others who have something to share a voice and an audience.

 

We have some compelling topics prepared for the near future, including musings on what constitutes a 'native plant', profiles of underappreciated plants found all over Canada, techniques for effective pollination garden design, and stories of how GIS and mapping technology are contributing to invasive species management.

 

We want this blog to generate discussion and community. If you have something to bring to the conversation and would like to volunteer as a guest blogger, don't hesitate to contact us!

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Written by: Nicole White

The CanPlant logo

 

We’re proud to share with you the thoughts, ideas, and process that went into choosing CanPlant as the new website name for the native plant database, and the some of the design considerations that went into the logo. In this post, we’ll discuss them both in more detail.

 

After Evergreen selected D&A to be the new custodians of the native plant database, one of the first tasks our team undertook was to come up with a new name. Not unlike picking a name for a child, this was something we took very seriously! Alas, the name is something that we would have to live with for a while.

 

Everyone at Dougan & Associates was asked to participate in brainstorming session to pitch their ideas. A few rounds of voting narrowed these down to a shortlist. We knew we wanted something concise, positive, and meaningful.

 

Once everyone had a chance to submit, we noticed a recurring trend of name ideas integrating the words ‘Canada’ and ‘plant’, with early suggestions including names like ‘iCanPlant’ and ‘Canada Plants’. In the end, D&A Ecologist Zack Harris’ submission of ‘CanPlant’ garnered the most votes. We like its simplicity and the double entendre of ‘Can’ –‘Canada’, and ‘YES, you CAN PLANT!’).

 

The CanPlant logo was collaboratively designed by D&A staff. In the brainstorming phase of this process, Canada as a whole, native flora, and ecology were identified as especially relevant symbolic themes. We also wanted to include some component in the design that acknowledged Evergreen, the founder of the database.

 

With these themes in mind (and with our collective propensity for being plant nerds), it was destined that the new logo feature plant imagery. We considered several different species, leaning toward widely-distributed Canadian flora. Initial ideas included Populus tremuloides (Trembling Aspen), Linnaea borealis (Twinflower), Mitella diphylla (Mitrewort), Cornus canadensis (Bunchberry), Picea glauca (White Spruce), and native ferns such as Polypodium virginianum (Rock Polypody).

 

One major challenge was to develop a universally applicable design. To simultaneously tackle this challenge and produce something beautiful, D&A’s Landscape Designer Heather Schibli took suggestions from the group, often translating written descriptions into visual language, prepared concepts, and iterating the results based on feedback from the D&A team.

 

Concepts were developed to represent a few core ideas – succession, urban to nature, a Canadian cross-section, and various types of leaves and other plant parts.

 

Ultimately, we landed on a text-based design that is simple and incorporates a single White Spruce silhouette for the A in PLANT. We felt that the simplicity of the design will allow it to be instantly recognizable as we move forward with our initiative to connect people to plants. And, the White Spruce is a great way to reflect the scope of the initiative (White Spruce is found in all of Canada’s provinces and territories) and pay tribute Evergreen (White Spruce is an Evergreen!).

 

Picea's glauca's countrywide distribution

 

Photo source: Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service.

 

Through the process of designing the logo, Heather created many other versions that we really loved. Down the road, we expect some of them may be used for other branding initiatives. One of our favourites incorporated the text logo with a backdrop that represents the phenomenon of ecological succession, both as it may apply to place and to time. We felt that the text and single White Spruce juxtaposed to the succession-inspired backdrop emphasizes that plants are dynamics, and the simple act of planting a few native species, over time can result in rich, complex, ecosystems.

 

CanPlant's alternate 'Succession' logo

 

We feel that both the name and logo will successfully represent the newly-relaunched plant database’s function and intended audience – offering gardeners, landscape architects, designers, ecologists, and anyone else across the country easily-accessible and relevant information they can use to connect with plants.

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