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European Lily Of The Valley

( Convallaria majalis )

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European Lily Of The Valley
Asparagaceae
Convallaria
Convallaria majalis
Linnaeus
Characteristics

Wildflower

Deciduous

3

Sun, Partial Shade, Shade

Clay, Sand, Loam

Normal, Moist

No

No

No

No
Habitat Considerations

Boreal Shield, Atlantic Maritime, Mixedwood Plains

Woodland, Savannah, Forest Edge, Prairie/Meadow/Field
Design Considerations

15 cm

30 cm

May - Jun

White/Cream

No

Yes

Red


Yes






Yes
Conservation Status

No


Interesting Tidbits

Native Range: Europe, temperate Asia Invasive Range: BC,ON,QC,NB,NS, possibly other provinces Time of Invasion: 1950s Invasion Pathway: Escape from ornamental cultivation Status: Of low to moderate concern Impacts: Competes aggressively with native plants, TOXIC to mammals Control Measures: Physical removal (Invasive Species in Canada) Spreading via rhizomes, it can be pulled up. (USDA PLANTS) POISONOUS PARTS: All parts. Toxic only if eaten in large quantities. (Poisonous Plants of N.C.) Symptoms: Irregular and slow pulse, abdominal pain and diarrhea. Toxic Principle: Cardiac glycosides and saponins. The plant contains cardiac glycosides as well as saponins. There are some references in the literature that mention poisoning and death in humans after accidental ingestion of the berries and leaves, and even by drinking the water that the plants were kept in. Frohne and Pfander (1983) suggest that serious cases are unlikely to occur because the glycosides are poorly absorbed. They cast doubt on the report of poisoning by ingesting water that lily-of-the- valley was standing in because experiments with animals did not substantiate these reports. However, in spite of these reservations, some cases of human poisoning are mentioned in the literature, and so these plants should be considered potentially poisonous. Because of the cardiac glycosides and saponins found in this plant, animals that have access to the plant material may be poisoned. Certainly, ingesting large quantities of lily-of-the-valley can cause problems to family pets such as cats and dogs. (Canadian Poisonous Plant Information System)


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