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Lambkill

( Kalmia angustifolia )

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Lambkill
Sheep Laurel
Ericaceae
Kalmia
Kalmia angustifolia
Linnaeus
Characteristics

Shrub

Deciduous

1

Sun, Partial Shade

Sand, Loam, Humus Enriched

Acidophile

Dry, Normal, Moist, Wet

Yes

No

No

No
Habitat Considerations

Taiga Shield, Boreal Shield, Atlantic Maritime, Mixedwood Plains, Prairies, Hudson Plains

Woodland, Forest Edge, Prairie/Meadow/Field, Bog/Fen

Pond Edge/Wetland Garden, Woodland, Prairie/Meadow
Design Considerations

30 cm

90 cm

May - Aug

Red|White/Cream|Pink

Yes

No

Brown

No

Columbia silkmoth| Northern Blue butterfly (Lycaeides idas)

No

No

No

No

Yes

No

Birds, Butterflies, Bees

No
Conservation Status



Interesting Tidbits

POISONOUS PARTS: All parts. HIGHLY TOXIC, MAYBE FATAL IF EATEN! Symptoms include: salivation, watering of eyes and nose, slow pulse, nausea, vomiting, sweating, abdominal pain, headache, tingling of skin, lack of coordination, convulsions, paralysis. Toxic Principle: Andromedotoxin, a resinoid; arbutin, a glycoside. (Poisonous Plants of N.C.) This plant contains a toxin that has poisoned cattle, goats, and sheep as well as humans. Poisoning rarely happens in the wild. Other animals have been poisoned by sheep-laurel, including zebras at a zoo, as well as horses. Meat of chickens that had ingested sheep-laurel may be toxic to other animals. The nectar contains the toxin that results in toxic honey (Marsh 1930, Kingsbury 1964, Verlangieri 1976, Lampe and McCann 1985). The entire plant is poisonous, including the nectar and honey made from it (Pritchard 1956, Kingsbury 1964). (Canadian Poisonous Plants Information System) Sheep Laurel has another common name, ""lambkill"", referring to the fact that this plant is poisonous to sheep and domestic cattle, althought it apparently has no effect on deer. (Strickland) Synonymous to K. carolina (Poisonous Plants of N. C.) A very adaptable species that grows as happily in bogs as it does in rich woods or the pure sand of old dunes. (Cullina, W.)


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