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Bur Oak

( Quercus macrocarpa )

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Bur Oak
Mossycup Oak
Blue Oak
Mossy Oak
White Oak
Burr Oak
Fagaceae
Quercus
Quercus macrocarpa
Michaux
SK, MB, ON, QC, NB
Characteristics

Tree

Deciduous

3

Sun, Partial Shade

Clay, Loam

Dry, Normal, Moist, Wet

Yes

Yes

No

No
Habitat Considerations

Atlantic Maritime, Mixedwood Plains, Prairies

Forest, Woodland, Riparian, Rocky Bluff

Woodland
Design Considerations

1200 cm

1800 cm

Apr - May

Yellow|Green/Brown

No

Yes

Brown


Edwards' Hairstreak (Satyrium edwardsii)

No

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Squirrels, Birds, Butterflies, Butterfly Larvae, Other Showy Insects

No
Conservation Status

No


Interesting Tidbits

Slow growing. A good urban tree since it is resistant to air pollution and car exhaust. POISONOUS PARTS: Acorns (seeds of nuts) and young leaves. Low toxicity if eaten. Symptoms include stomach pain, constipation and later bloody diarrhea, excessive thirst and urination. (Poisonous Plants of N.C.) An individual tree does not produce nuts until it reaches at least 30 years of age. Individual trees can live several centuries(400 years or more). Not only are acorns large, but they have a distinctive appearance because of the conspicuous fringe along the rim of their cups. (Illinois Wildflowers) Bur Oaks keep a respectful distance from each other; they hold each other off, not so much by their wide-spreading branches as by the fierce competition of their root systems. (Peattie) Traditional Medical Uses: Native peoples made a bark decoction with astringent properties to treat diarrhea, wounds, sores, hemorrhoids, poison oak and insect bites. Other Uses: Cabinetry, flooring, building and fence posts. Wildlife Use: The acorns are eaten by many birds and mammals including squirrels, rabbits, mice, deer, wood ducks and blue jays, which frequently cache the acorns for later use. The foliage is eaten by deer and cattle. Red-tailed hawks, screech owls, fox squirrels and flying squirrels nest in large trees of Bur Oak. (USDA PLANTS)


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