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Northern Red Oak

( Quercus rubra )

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Northern Red Oak
Red Oak
Grey Oak
Eastern Red Oak
Fagaceae
Quercus
Quercus rubra
Linnaeus
Quercus borealis
Quercus maxima
Characteristics

Tree

Deciduous

3

Sun, Partial Shade, Shade

Clay, Sand, Loam, Humus Enriched

Acidophile

Normal, Moist

Yes

No

Yes

Yes
Habitat Considerations

Boreal Shield, Atlantic Maritime, Mixedwood Plains

Woodland, Savannah, Forest Edge, Rocky Bluff

Hedgerow/Thicket/Windbreak/Screening, Woodland
Design Considerations

1500 cm

3000 cm

Apr - May

Green/Brown

No

Yes

Brown


Grey Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)



Yes

Yes

Yes


Squirrels, Birds, Butterfly Larvae

No
Conservation Status

No


Interesting Tidbits

PE

POISONOUS PARTS: Acorns (seeds of nuts) and young leaves. Low toxicity if eaten. Symptoms include stomach pain, constipation and later bloody diarrhea, excessive thirst and urination. (Poisonous Plants of N.C.) Distinguished by shallow acorn cup, shallow pointed lobes(on leaves), reddish buds,old trees with deeply ridged bark. (Sibley Guide to Trees) According to (Farrar), this tree ranges from east of Lake Superior to Nova Scotia and P.E.I. The acorns are food for wild life and birds. Its beautiful wood has long been valued for furniture and flooring. Long- lived, cold-hardy, fast growing and providing exellent shade, this tree is often planted in cities. Red oak is often used in the restoration of wildlife habitat and degraded sites. (Benvie)


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