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Staghorn Sumac

( Rhus typhina )

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Staghorn Sumac
Velvet Sumac
Sumac Vinegar Tree
Anacardiaceae
Rhus
Rhus typhina
Linnaeus
NB, NS, ON, PE, QC
Rhus hirta
Rhus typhina var. laciniata
Characteristics

Shrub

Deciduous

4

Sun, Partial Shade

Clay, Sand, Loam

Dry, Normal

Yes

No

Yes

Yes
Habitat Considerations

Boreal Shield, Atlantic Maritime, Mixedwood Plains

Forest Edge, Prairie/Meadow/Field, Riparian, Rocky Bluff

Bird, Hedgerow/Thicket/Windbreak/Screening, Prairie/Meadow
Design Considerations

90 cm

800 cm

Jun - Jul

Yellow|Green/Brown

No

Yes

Red


No

No

Yes

Yes

No

No

Birds, Butterflies, Bees

No
Conservation Status

No


Interesting Tidbits

The tannin-rich fruit, bark and leaves were used to tan hides. The leaves and fruits were boiled to make black ink, and the dried leaves were an ingredient in smoking mixtures. (Kershaw) Sensory Aspect: Soft, velvet twigs Sumac has been cultivated in Europe for centuries as an ornamental prized for its vivid fall foliage and distintive fruit. Aboriginals made a drink from the fruit which tastes like lemonade and has a high vitamin C content. Fruit and twigs are an important source of food for moose, deer, rabbits, rodents and birds such as pheasant and grouse. (Lauriault) Attractive to Birds: Berries are a preferred food source for ruffed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, eastern phoebe, common crow, northern mockingbird, gray catbird, American robin, wood thrush, hermit thrush, eastern bluebird and European starling. It is also used by over 30 other species, and since the fruit hangs on throughout the winter, is another excellent emergency source of food. Honeybees are attracted to the flowers in spring. (Macphail)


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