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American Mountain Ash

( Sorbus americana )

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American Mountain Ash
American Rowan Tree
Dogberry
Catberry
Pigberry
Roundwood
Missey Mossey
Rosaceae
Sorbus
Sorbus americana
Marshall
NB, NL, NS, ON, PE, QC
Pyrus americana
Pyrus microcarpa
Characteristics

Tree

Deciduous

2

Sun, Partial Shade

Clay, Sand, Loam

Dry, Normal, Moist

No

No

Yes

No
Habitat Considerations

Boreal Shield, Atlantic Maritime, Mixedwood Plains, Hudson Plains

Woodland, Forest Edge, Swamp/Marsh, Rocky Bluff, Lakeshores

Bird, Hedgerow/Thicket/Windbreak/Screening, Woodland
Design Considerations

400 cm

1000 cm

May - Jun

White/Cream

No

Yes

Red|Orange

No

No

No

Yes


Yes


Squirrels, Birds

No
Conservation Status

No


1
Interesting Tidbits

The fruits (fresh or dried) contain iron and vitamin C. They are also acidic and rich in tannins, however, and should be eaten in moderation. (Kershaw) The tree and its parts is generally non-toxic but its raw fruit eaten to excess can be a gastro-intestinal irritant because it contains a substance called sorbitol. (Hospital for Sick Children) It is difficult to find reliable sources of native species of mountain ash. It is another situation where mislabelling occurs. There is no way of knowing, short of having a trained person on-site to check the stock, whether it is true to name or simply European mountain-ash labelled as American or showy. The best clue for I.D. is the terminal buds. European mountain-ash has downy buds, while the two native species have smooth and sticky buds. (G. Miller) This tree is a preferred browse for moose, deer, martens, fishers, snowshoe hare and ruffed grouse. The berries are spread by birds. (Wildflower Centre, LBJ)


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